Southern Seminary’s Hispanic program adds new professors, reduces online costs

Southern Seminary students (left to right) Joel Peña, Jairo Namnún and Erick Jimenez, all from the same church in the Dominican Republic, sit together at Towery Plaza.
Southern Seminary students (left to right) Joel Peña, Jairo Namnún and Erick Jimenez, all from the same church in the Dominican Republic, sit together at Towery Plaza.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (SBTS) — The addition of two influential Latino pastors to the faculty and significant discounts for online Hispanic students are key elements of a new initiative at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary designed to serve more effectively those called to ministry in the Spanish-speaking world.

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“The Lord has opened an incredible door for Southern Seminary to minister all over the globe, but in a powerful new way to form this partnership for the Hispanic Initiatives,” said Southern Seminary President R. Albert Mohler Jr. “The Spanish-speaking world is on Southern Seminary’s heart, and we see both a great opportunity and a great responsibility. Prosperity theology and other challenges have made significant inroads into the Hispanic world. At the same time, there is an incredible, even unprecedented openness to the gospel and we are excited to establish partnerships with pastors and churches who we see as the crucial leaders for an awakening of Christ’s church in the Spanish-speaking world.”

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Southern Seminary to serve Louisville in fourth annual 1937 Project

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The 1937 Project is a campus-wide outreach as part of Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer's Give A Day week of service, which Southern Seminary has participated in since 2012.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (SBTS) — The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary will participate in Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s Give A Day Week of service with the fourth annual 1937 Project, April 23. The mayor’s office said the outreach, which honors the seminary’s role in helping the city recover from the 1937 Great Flood, is “one of the largest, most consistent groups over the last four years.”

“The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary is an integral part of our Give A Day week of service,” Fischer said. “Last year they helped over 3,000 kids participate in a toy giveaway and this year they will organize a cleanup in Shelby Park, work with the Louisville Nature Center, among many other projects. We are sending a message that Louisville is taking its place among the world’s great cities, and compassion is one of our greatest strengths! For that, I have to say to all of you — thank you. What you’ve done has been amazing and inspiring.”

The 1937 Project unites students of Southern Seminary and the city of Louisville for a day of community service. Volunteers will gather April 23 to serve in more than 20 teams across Louisville. According to seminary leaders, the outreach is designed to further its gospel witness and practically meet the needs of Louisville residents, as well as modeling Christian service for future church leaders.

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Great Commission Summit: Engage Muslims with ‘gospel love’

In order to fulfill the Great Commission, the church must learn how to teach and make disciples of the 1.6 million Muslims around the world, doing away with cultural fear and embracing them with gospel love, said Southern Baptist leaders during the Great Commission Summit at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, March 29-31. The three-day event featured leading thinkers in the Southern Baptist Convention in engaging Islam and handling the refugee crisis, along with student-led prayer for Muslims around the world.

David Platt, president of the International Mission Board, preaches during a March 31 chapel during the Great Commission Summit
David Platt, president of the International Mission Board, urges Christians to be compassionate toward the refugee's plight during a March 31 chapel during the Great Commission Summit.

With millions of refugees fleeing their home countries, many of them from Muslim countries like Syria and Sudan, Christians should view the refugee crisis through the lens of God’s posture of mercy and compassion to the foreigner demonstrated in the story of Ruth, said David Platt, president of the International Mission Board, during a March 31 chapel message at Southern Seminary.

“Our God seeks, shelters, serves, and showers the refugee with his grace,” Platt said, pointing out Boaz’s response to learning that Ruth, a Moabite woman, was working in his field. Boaz’s actions in the Old Testament book did not just demonstrate godly kindness, but also functioned as a critical moment in redemptive history, building a lineage that would “lead to the quintessential kinsman redeemer, Jesus the Christ.”

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Offer an ‘apologetic of love,’ speakers say at Southern Seminary’s Driven By Truth conference

Southern Seminary President R. Albert Mohler Jr. encouraged attendees at the March 18-19 Driven By Truth conference to "offer an apologetic of love."
Southern Seminary President R. Albert Mohler Jr. encouraged attendees at the March 18-19 Driven By Truth conference to "offer an apologetic of love."

Secularization requires that Christians articulate their worldview in defense of the truth, evangelical leaders said at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary’s inaugural Driven By Truth conference, March 18-19.

“A conference like this is important, because from this generation forward no Christian will have a non-apologetic moment, and we must learn how to live faithfully in the world,” Southern Seminary President R. Albert Mohler Jr. told the 200 conference attendees.

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Overcome critics with kindness, Dykes says at Southern Seminary chapel

Pastors should choose love rather than discouragement when mean-spirited people criticize their ministries, said Southern Baptist leader David O. Dykes during a March 22 chapel message at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

David O. Dykes, member of the executive committee of the Southern Baptist Convention and two-time Southern Seminary alumnus, preaches from Rom. 12 at SBTS chapel, March 22.
David O. Dykes, member of the executive committee of the Southern Baptist Convention and two-time Southern Seminary alumnus, preaches from Rom. 12 at SBTS chapel, March 22.

“Brothers and sisters, you’re going to encounter some mean people even in the church today. But God has called us to show forth the fruit of the Spirit; God has called us to show forth his light and his love,” said Dykes, member of the executive committee of the Southern Baptist Convention and two-time Southern Seminary alumnus. He is also pastor of Green Acres Baptist Church in Tyler, Texas.

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Strong view of Christ overcomes despair, Dilbeck says at Southern Seminary chapel

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Hance Dilbeck is the senior pastor of Quail Springs Baptist Church in Oklahoma City and serves as the president of the Baptist General Convention of Oklahoma.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (SBTS) — A weak view of Christ is the result of many Christians today not thinking about theological issues, said Oklahoma Baptist leader Hance Dilbeck in a chapel message at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, March 17.

“The sad thing about the church today is that we don’t think much. We don’t think much about anything. And unfortunately, we don’t think much about our Christology,” said Dilbeck, president of the Baptist General Convention of Oklahoma. “Most of our thoughts today about the Christ are surface and shallow and sentimental.”

Dilbeck illustrated this point by describing a real-life interaction of a mother and her daughter in Oklahoma City. After seeing a bronze statue of Jesus, the young girl rightly identified the figure. While she recognized him, her knowledge of who Jesus was came out when she added, “He died on an Easter egg hunt.”

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Mendoza urges Boyce College students to ‘labor’ for wisdom  

Jose Mendoza (right), director of the Institute of Wisdom and Integrity in the Dominican Republic, speaks to Boyce College students at a March 9 chapel service as Ivan Mesa (left) translates.
Jose Mendoza (right), director of the Institute of Wisdom and Integrity in the Dominican Republic, speaks to Boyce College students at a March 9 chapel service as Ivan Mesa (left) translates.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (SBTS) — In the first-ever Boyce College chapel service preached in Spanish on March 9, pastor Jose Mendoza encouraged students to recognize their need for wisdom and work hard to obtain it.

“Wisdom requires a certain attitude,” said Mendoza, director of the Institute of Wisdom and Integrity and associate pastor of Iglesia Bautista Internacional in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. “For in the book of Proverbs, we have 31 chapters and of those 31 chapters, 10 are dedicated to a change in your attitude to show you why wisdom matters and why you should seek it.”

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Cross of Christ condemns pride, Meyer says at SBTS chapel

Jesus Christ’s death on the cross signals the ultimate death of human pride, said Minnesota pastor Jason Meyer at his March 15 chapel message at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Preaching on the relationship between Psalm 22 and its allusions in Mark 15, Meyer showed how the Psalms set the trajectory for the New Testament’s condemnation of pride.

Jason Meyer, pastor for preaching and vision at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota, preached on the pride-crushing power of the cross in Alumni Chapel, March 15.
Jason Meyer, pastor for preaching and vision at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota, preached on the pride-crushing power of the cross in Alumni Chapel, March 15.

“So many people think the Psalms are comforting and soothing. But many times they’re also downright disturbing, so jarring that they shatter any sense of swagger that we have,” said Meyer, a two-time graduate of Southern Seminary with both an M.Div. and a Ph.D. Meyer is pastor for preaching and vision at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota, succeeding John Piper, who served in that role for 33 years.

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Boyce College senior receives NCCAA Maravich basketball award

 

Ben Akers, a senior forward for the Boyce Bulldogs, received the NCCAA Division II Pete Maravich Memorial Award.
Ben Akers, a senior forward for the Boyce Bulldogs, received the NCCAA Division II Pete Maravich Memorial Award.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (SBTS) — A Boyce College senior who never played organized basketball before donning a Bulldogs uniform took home the NCCAA’s top award for Division II athletes, the organization announced March 8. Ben Akers, a senior forward from Danville, Kentucky, is the first Boyce player to win the Pete Maravich Memorial Award, given annually to the most outstanding student-athlete in NCCAA men’s basketball.

“Ben has been a great example of the fact that hard work pays off,” said Boyce Bulldogs head coach Blake Rogers. “Ben never played organized basketball before coming to Boyce, but he has developed to be one of the best 3-point shooters in our league and has consistently led the nation in 3-points made.”

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Southern Seminary’s Renown Youth Conference encourages students to seek wisdom

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Boyce College student band Lexington Road leads worship at the March 5-6 Renown Youth Conference.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (SBTS) — Leaders at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary challenged more than 600 middle and high school students to seek wisdom with a Christian worldview, March 5-6, at the Renown Youth Conference, hosted by Southern’s undergraduate school Boyce College.

“If you start somewhere other than, ‘In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth,’ you are not wise,” Southern Seminary President R. Albert Mohler Jr. said. “That’s where wisdom starts.”

Mohler challenged the 646 students and leaders — the annual conference’s highest attendance in five years — to seek wisdom through a study of biblical wisdom literature.

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